Is there Such a Thing as a Stifling Entrepreneurial Paradise?

Why one study claims that there is.
In today’s age of entrepreneurial juice, rapid business spinoff-ing, and socially based startups, we find ourselves living in cities full of options. Should we work from home? From the multitude of coffee shops offering drool-worthy espresso and comfy seats? From a stool ponied up to a craft brew-filled bar? Or perhaps an office is something we find necessary? Many, especially those hidden in the layers of the corporate ladder, see all the above as ‘cool,’ ‘hip,’ and desirable. The truth is, though, for those of us making the choice, it can be a source of concern. How does the environment affect my work quality? Where can I position myself physically to make new contacts or have chance encounters with potential new clients? Where is it that I can learn most from those around me? Or, more importantly, where can I be inspired? An article published yesterday on Forbes drew a line in the sand. Writer Cliff Oxford made a big claim about those incubator spaces that have been so highly touted as the most prestigious option for today’s entrepreneur – they don’t work, he says. Note that for Oxford, he distinguishes incubator spaces from the co-working spaces as being those that provide education, networking, and most importantly, exclusive entree for only those companies that “fit the bill.” It’s a bold article, a bold statement, and a VERY provocative point. Is it possible to work in an “incubator” so cool that one’s desire to move up, to graduate if you will, no longer exists? Can you get so captivated by the comfort of this incubation chamber that you lose the drive for independence, to stand alone? This provocative position can be read HERE in its entirety, and I encourage you all to consider this possibility. When you consider the appeal of the space you chose to create your work, perhaps one consideration needs to go toward ensuring it isn’t TOO appealing, unless of course growth is not in your vision. Give us a little feedback on the article here if you will. We would love to hear some counter arguments to Oxford’s bullish point.
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